Leading by Example

Leadership is complicated. Leadership is a serious responsibility. Leadership drives change.

Those statements scare some away, as leadership is not for the faint of heart. And there are some who embrace the complexity, responsibility and change. I definitely fall into the latter category.

Last week I was asked if the job of principal is too complex? Initially I thought complex, yes, but too complex? It is only as complex as you make it! Being a leader requires you to know “who you are, what you stand for and lead by example,” a quote whose origin is unknown and that I shared with my students every Friday to launch them into the weekend.

So who am I?

I love my people. I am a firm believer in the need for a trusting culture to support the sweeping changes that need to take place in education today. I purposefully take time each day to ask staff how they are doing, leave positive notes, and make good news calls home. I value building relationships with all members of my learning community so that I am better able to serve them. I am a learner who has learned that our public educational system, which has changed very little over the past 100+ years, needs a major overhaul. We can do better for our children, but we have to be willing to step out of our comfort zones, take risks, and make mistakes. No longer can I accept classrooms where desks are in rows, worksheets as common practice and where one paper-pencil test is considered a valid assessment, as being best practices. Students need opportunities to struggle, ask deep questions and seek answers. Classrooms should be a hive of active collaboration where a teacher facilitates learning, rather than dispensing knowledge. It is imperative that educators today remember that we teach children, not content and what may be good for one may not meet the needs of all. I am a connected educator, who is constantly learning from my tribe. I read, ask questions, join Twitter chats and am part of multiple Voxer groups with educational leaders and experts from across the country willing to share advice at the drop of a hat. “Many hands make light work” and see some amazing things happening in education across the country! I am a collaborator who prefers to have multiple team members at the table. We are stronger together. The most successful changes that I have been a part of were when the many voices came together in consensus. It is a beautiful thing!

What do I stand for?

  • I stand for learning.

I LOVE learning. I value learning. I model the joy of learning. I expect teachers to make learning fun for our students. If learning is not valued and enjoyed, it is not learning. It is compliance, the enemy of learning.

  • I stand for kids.

ALL kids. ALL kids deserve a joyful education regardless of the color of their skin, religion they practice, gender, learning challenge they are working to overcome, or behavior they display. They are all our kids. Are the decisions we make based on what is best for kids? If not, then it is time to rethink!

  • I stand for acceptance, kindness and love.

I accept people for who they are, beautifully made through their life experiences, challenges and baggage. I hope others choose to accept me and all of my flaws. Kindness is essential in every interaction. We are all doing the best that we can, so the least we can do is speak kindly to one another. “Love wins, love always wins.” Words I live by, shared by author Mitch Album.

  • I stand for inclusion.

Inclusion in programming for our students. Inclusion in social groups, both students and staff. My dream is to work in a school where everyone belongs and exclusive groups don’t exist. We are better together. Period.

How do I lead by example?

I teach an advisory class. I supervise lunches and dismissal. I am in classrooms everyday. I make a good news call of the day to a student’s parents. I play with students at recess. I ask students how they are doing and greet everyone I pass in the halls. I check in with staff to see how things are going. I provide ongoing feedback to staff members. I challenge the status quo. I ask a lot of questions. I listen. I learn. Constantly. I work to be better and do better, always improving. I find ways to say yes.

So, is the job of principal too complex? Not too complex, but definitely complex! So all you leaders out there, (yes WMS staff, each one of you is a leader whether you realize it or not!) take a moment to reflect on the three questions identified above: who are you, what do you stand for, and how do you lead by example?

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